Survivor Stories

Selena: Overcoming Abuse and Helping Fellow Survivors to Heal

Selena_calloutSelena, a native of Trinidad, is a sur­vivor of cruel, harsh domestic violence inflicted by her husband of 17 years. During Selena’s stay at a URI shelter, she felt “free, empowered, and reborn.” She said that she was a “new person … no longer a victim.” While at the shelter, Selena demonstrated concern for the other survivors and was always ready, willing, and able to help her fellow residents. Selena assisted the other residents by providing peer counseling, emotional support, and resources, and she represented the Urban Women’s Retreat at a mini-conference held in collaboration with Urban Women’s New Beginnings, where she spoke of her experiences. Selena prepared to enter the workforce by participating in URI’s Working Internship Network program, and she is currently studying to take the GED exam. She remains upbeat and is deeply concerned about issues that affect women and children. Selena has a passion for helping others, and her ulti­mate goal is to work in the helping field with survivors of domestic violence.

Mary’s Story: A New Beginning

Mary fled to New York after the abuser tracked her down at a shelter in her home state. She entered one of the URI shelters with her children. Because Mary did not have legal status in the U.S., she feared the abuser, a U.S. citizen, would take her children and have her deported back to Haiti. She was especially concerned in light of the devastating earthquake that occurred in Haiti in January, 2010.

1 in 4_calloutWhile in shelter, Mary was referred to the Domestic Violence Legal Education and Advocacy Program (LEAP). After assessing her situation, LEAP realized that Mary did not qualify for a self-petition under the Violence Against Women Act, because she and the abuser were not married. Mary also was not eligible to apply for a U visa because when she fled from her home state, her court cases were dismissed.

After careful review, LEAP determined that Mary qualified for Temporary Protected Status (TPS), a status designated by the Secretary of Homeland Security recognizing that nationals of certain countries are unable to return home safely due to temporary conditions, such as ongoing armed conflict or environmental disasters.

LEAP prepared and filed a TPS petition for Mary, which was approved. She was also granted a work permit and qualified for medical benefits. Mary can now work and support her family.

Pattie’s Escape From Abuse

Pattie was told by her parents that a marriage had been arranged for her, which is common in their Hindu culture. Pattie married Vin in Guyana after knowing him for only a few days. Within the first year, Pattie gave birth to a son. Vin, a U.S. citizen, started the immigration process so that Pattie and their son could come live with him in America.

homicide victims_calloutUnfortunately, when Pattie arrived to the U.S., she learned that Vin was controlling and violent. She was not allowed to leave the home nor use the telephone. He would lock her inside the apartment, beat her with a belt, and frequently push her around. After he held a knife to her throat and threatened to kill her, she escaped from the abuser. She stayed with family until they pressured her to return home. The abuse continued. She escaped again and later entered a URI shelter. Pattie participates in counseling and other supportive services at the shelter, and her self-esteem and self-confidence have improved.

She travelled to Albany with URI staff and other survivors for Legislative Awareness Day, and lobbied for laws that would improve the lives of victims of domestic violence. Pattie also received help from the Domestic Violence Legal Education and Advocacy Program (LEAP), because the abuser had not completed the immigration process. LEAP filed U visa cases for both Pattie and her son.